STUDY OF TIME AND MOTION A Short Film

Film to be released in 2017

ABOUT THE PERFORMANCES

Study of Time and Motion is a collaborative performance project that explores human connection within the modern push toward efficiency. A series of site specific performances reactivate Seattle’s vacant Georgetown Steam Plant and the Duwamish River it once relied upon. Inspired by Steam Plant designer Frank Gilbreth’s and his wife Lillian’s 18 iconic gestures of efficiency and inefficiency, performers grasp, position, and reposition objects and themselves with measured cadence. When choreographed repetition frays, efficiency becomes the fulcrum through which performers maintain emotional and physical proximity to one another. Incorporating video installation at the plant and public signposts along the environs of the Duwamish River, this multidisciplinary project invites viewers to think through how the body moves us forward.

GEORGETOWN STEAM PLANT

connect/reposition

DURATIONAL PERFORMANCE
October 24, 12–5pm

Audience is free to navigate this work at their own pace

FINAL PERFORMANCE
November 13th 7pm
November 14th, 4pm & 7pm
November 15th, 1pm & 4pm

Experience the arch of this choreographed work through a guided tour.

connect/reposition is a choreographed meditation that questions: What impact does our desire for progressive perfection have on human interaction and our relationships with constructed and natural environments?

The choreography was developed in collaboration with the performers: Ezra Dickinson, Rachael Lincoln, Mary Margaret Moore, Aaron Swartzman, and kt Shores.

Georgetown Steam Plant

6605 13th Ave S
Seattle, WA 98108

DUWAMISH RIVER

rest/forward

rest/forward is a choreographed meditation that asks: Can the human body restore a river that has experienced great loss in its meandering relationship with industry?

Set along the Duwamish River, this work reactivates motion studies expert Frank Gilbreth’s 18 elemental gestures of efficiency and inefficiency. During a five hour span, six performers assemble and disassemble, cycling through pedestrian actions in measured cadence that frays only with repetition and time. rest/forward explores the human connection within our contemporary push toward efficiency by traversing the river as an archival site of natural rhythms.

The choreography was developed in collaboration with the performers: Ezra Dickinson, Mary Margaret Moore, Aaron Swartzman, and kt Shores.

September 19th, 2-7pm

The Estuary / T108 Park
4651 Diagonal Ave S
Seattle, WA 98134

COLLABORATORS

Performers

Ezra Dickinson
Rachael Lincoln
Mary Margaret Moore
Kt Shores
Aaron Swartzman

Artists

Elissa Favero - Art Historian / Tour Guide
Grant Bowen - Environmental Designer
Eric Olson - Webmaster

HENRY ART GALLERY

approaching proximity

approaching proximity, in "Six Weeks, In Time." 2016. Henry Art Gallery, University of Washington, Seattle.
Photo credit: Jonathan Vanderweit.

As part of Six Weeks, In Time, Tia Kramer and Tamin Totzke present a durational performance that prioritizes human connection and challenges contemporary notions of efficiency. Influenced by motion studies experts Frank and Lillian Gilbreth’s 18 elemental gestures of efficiency and inefficiency, a group of performers will transform object-oriented gestures into human-to-human relationships.

The choreography was developed in collaboration with the performers: Grant Bowen, Jeff Huston, Mary Margaret Moore, and kt Shores.

April 2nd & 17th, 11:30am-3:30pm

Henry Art Gallery
15th Ave. NE & NE 41st St.
Seattle, WA 98195